Bystander Intervention Education

Why Compile This Information?

This reunions, we stand with those who have been harmed by interpersonal violence throughout Princeton’s history. This reunions, we urge the University to reform its handling of interpersonal violence and to address Princeton IX Now’s eleven calls for reform. This reunions, we recognize that sexual assault and harassment happen in and out of the tents; we come together to call for a safer reunions.

As alumni, we have immense power to create change.

The University must strive to be a place of safety and support for all people of all identities. Help us create a safer environment.

Two students linking hands in front of Nassau Hall during a demonstration in the light rain. Photo by Brad Spicher.

Two students linking hands in front of Nassau Hall during a demonstration in the light rain. Photo by Brad Spicher.

What are Red-Flags of Predatory Behavior?

You see a person…

  • Clearly intoxicated (stumbling, slurring words, vomiting, etc.)

  • Appearing disoriented or isolated from others

  • Serving someone a lot of alcohol (especially a minor)

  • Tampering with drinks

  • Making unwelcome physical contact or interactions

  • Sequestering someone to the periphery or outside of the tent (especially if the person is reluctant or clearly intoxicated)

When you see these red-flags, someone is either currently experiencing predatory behavior or is able to be easily targeted. It is crucial that you step in to prevent interpersonal violence at this stage.

Students in light rain during the sit-in in front of Nassau Hall chanting. One person holds a sign that says ‘ENOUGH.’ in red lettering. Photo by Brad Spicher.

Students in light rain during the sit-in in front of Nassau Hall chanting. One person holds a sign that says ‘ENOUGH.’ in red lettering. Photo by Brad Spicher.

Three Tactics for Intervention

When you see predatory behavior, resist the urge to let someone else deal with it. Intervening can be intimidating but your actions will prevent significant harm.

There are three main types of interventions—direct confrontation, delegation of action, and distraction—that can be used to stop a situation from worsening. Pick which one is most comfortable and pledge to follow through when you see red flags. To help, we’ve compiled suggestions for each tactic.

Direct

  • “They’re too intoxicated to give consent right now”

  • “They’re staying with us”

  • “That’s not appropriate”

  • “We’ll walk them back”

Delegate

  • Grab a bouncer

  • Notify a bartender

  • Ask a friend to help you

  • Get one of their friends involved

Distract

  • Spill a beer near the situation

  • Take your classmate for water

  • Ask them to request a song

  • Interrupt with a random conversation

Our Poster Campaign

You should see posters around campus encouraging bystander intervention. We’ve also made a shareable post on our social media that explains each one in depth. Please share this information (and the post below) with your classmates and help make reunions safer for all!